Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald Movie Review

Updated: Jan 20, 2019


Eddie Redmayne and Jude Law Stars in FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF GRINDELWALD

For a film franchise that has spanned over seventeen years, one might expect the most recent installments to be nothing more than a mere cash grab, as writer and producer J.K. Rowling attempts to milk and squeeze every dollar out of her ever loyal fan base with countless unnecessary and trivial additions to her lore. In some regards, this statement does ring true for Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, the latest installment in the film visioning of the Wizarding World. But in other regards, notably the visual aesthetics and mellow storytelling, it attempts to differentiate itself from the other entries in the franchise, delivering what is essentially one of the most unique and inspired entries for both the better and worse. Stridden by a stunning direction from the helm of David Yates and company and a bold, dark tone for the franchise, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald barely makes it over its storytelling stumbles to create a remotely satisfying addition to the Wizarding World, even if its’ means of doing so is convoluted and structurally unsound.



Zoe Kravitz and Johnny Depp Stars in FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF GRINDELWALD

One of the most celebrated authors of recent memory is unquestionably J.K. Rowling, author of the acclaimed and best-selling phenomenon Harry Potter. For an author whose first works were simplified and easily interpretable, it’s hard to grasp that Rowling was so overly ambitious with her latest screenplay. Featuring a total of five disparate storylines and an over-populated cast of characters, the film attempts to weave them all together into a 134-minute boundary. But doing so costs the film one of its most necessary traits-cohesive storytelling.


Katherine Waterston and Eddie Redmayne Stars in FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF GRINDELWALD

From a mere twenty minutes in, the story became convoluted, introducing storytelling and characters at a moment’s notice. There is no natural sensation from this storytelling and it softens the emotio