The Great Buddha+ Movie Review

Thanks to Cheng Cheng Films for a complimentary screener of this film for the purposes of review in advance of its opening in Atlanta in November this year:


Image Courtesy of Cheng Cheng Films Publicity

If the movie The Great Buddha+ had to be described in just two words, they would “predictably comedic.” From the beginning of the story, the movie is a sprawling series of dialogue that is both hilarious and entertaining to boot, a glorified attribute of the film that its filmmakers richly carry throughout. And with its intriguing storyline, The Great Buddha+ quickly escalates into a magnitude of filmmaking. Beginning with the introduction of Pickle, a man with multiple jobs and takes care of his sick mother, the film chronicles the journey of Pickle through a unique lens. During the night shift, Pickle works as a security guard for a man named Kevin. This structural decision leads to multiple sequences involving Pickle and his friend Belly Button looking at profane magazines, an example of the ludicrous aspects of the film. However, their television malfunctions, leading the pair to be forced to watch videos on Kevin’s dash cam, leading to several exposes the true “colors” of their boss.

Image Courtesy of Cheng Cheng Films Publicity

Leading to a cascade of escalating events, climaxing in a shocking plot twist, The Great Buddha+ never became an experience that was either wholly unique or original, outside of a poignant finale that will lead a bitter-sweet taste in viewers’ mouths.



Image Courtesy of Cheng Cheng Films Publicity

Directed with utter finesse by Huang Hsin-yao, known for his work with 2010’s documentary Taivalu, the film shows a level of craft that even bends down to the most obscure details such as the individual casting of each role. The performances on displ