The Post Movie Review


Image Courtesy of Amblin Entertainment

Last year, one of the most overlooked releases in cinema was The Post, one of Steven Spielberg’s most prominent release, bested only by this year’s Ready Player One. After only receiving two nominations at the Academy Awards, it didn’t strike a chord at the box office and was also shut out critically. But by doing so, the general public unfortunately had The Post, an ultimately spectacular drama over the politics and logistics of journalism, swept cleanly under their view. Starring Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep in leading roles, The Post covers the Washington Post and their decisive choice to release a massive exposing of classified military secrets, shockingly spanning and revealing the lies of four US presidents. But with the government quickly moving against their plans, the importance of both the press and the truth is called into question. From the beginning, this pitch is enticing. It’s a relatively unknown story that highlights one of the most prominent features of our society-the press and is culturally relevant. But the film itself and its outstanding merits, from the performances in Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep to the luscious and ambient original score, should be commended as well and with the empty holiday season in full effect, should be recognized by more people. Boasting an outstanding ensemble, Spielberg’s The Post is a riveting collision of earth-shattering craft, only scorched by its somewhat lackluster finale.



Image Courtesy of Amblin Entertainment

The screenplay of the entire production is mostly moderate. There aren’t any glaring issues, outside of the conclusion, that compromise the enjoyment factor. Yes, there are certainly pacing issues present that make the overuse of exposition sequences all the more apparent. But with regards to exposition, it’s actually rather free of indulgence. The Post expects its audiences to keep up with the characters and the current politics explored. Failing to do so for even a couple of sequences can leave the viewer dazed and confused, until the film’s traditional and disappointing wrap-up.


Image Courtesy of Amblin Entertainment

That finale, the peak of any film, is a prominent issue. Instead of taking a more emotionally riveting route, it ends on a bland, somewhat sour note. The predictability of the situation begins to show and it causes the film to slow in its momentum.